A head of garlic, a shallot, and a red onion for comparison. Credit: savory simple  Above: slow-roasted shallots from bon Appetit

A head of garlic, a shallot, and a red onion for comparison. Credit: savory simple

Above: slow-roasted shallots from bon Appetit

Varieties grown: Conservor

Shallots aren’t simply miniature onions—they have their own particular flavor, storage life, and uses. They are a staple in traditional European cooking. Their flavor is mild and sweet, though distinct, and they lack the acrid bite of raw onions; this makes them perfect for use in their raw form. They have an incredibly long storage life for such small bulbs, and will keep for six or more months in the right conditions.

How to use them:

  • Minced into dressings, marinades, and sauces; for instance, in the classic oyster-accompanying mignonette sauce

  • Sliced thinly and added to salads or sandwiches

  • For use in soups and stews, as well as in braised meat dishes

  • Chopped and added to delicate egg dishes and savory tarts

  • Roasted with a root vegetable medley (halve or quarter them so they are a similar size as the other vegetables, or else they’ll burn)